buddhist discipline

buddhist discipline

There are many different methods of discipline in Buddhism. Myriad in fact. One method, or the morality or discipline that is prescribed in one particular teaching almost contradicts with another morality or method or discipline in other Buddha’s teachings. For instance, you know this is actually why ordinary people not knowing the ultimate aspect or nonduality there is so many misunderstandings. For instance like if you go to traditional Buddhist societies or countries like Thailand or Sri Lanka. There the monks would eat meat. It is not because they are allowed to eat meat but they are supposed to eat whatever is given or offered on that day. But then again if you go to places like Japan or China, the Mahayana practitioners, for them the discipline is no meat at all. So there is already some kind of a contradiction within the Buddhist discipline. There is so many of that. What is allowed to one person is not allowed for others. And then for Tantrayana practitioners, many people seem to have misconception that tantric people are allowed to doing lots of things that are not allowed to others which is not true. There is never an allowance, there is never – to be more precise, there is no, it’s like methods or the disciplines such as shaving hair in Buddhism for the monks is purely a skillful means. So in other words what I am saying is again, nonduality have to take the precedence, or nonduality is more important than shaving hair or not shaving. It is to understand the nonduality, it is to actualize the nonduality the discipline such as like monks vow or nuns precept vows are applied. Purely to understand the nonduality. See if, again, if we loose the nonduality and if Buddhism really puts an importance to the morality then it will become very dangerous. Because then a value of a practitioner will be judged by who is morally good and right. And this is very dangerous because many times we know that morally somebody could be – of course we are using a very big language, morality. Somebody could be very good with the morality but they may have no compassion, they may have no understanding of the truth. And because there is no understanding of the truth, and because of that there is no compassion. The morality actually becomes a pillar for our pride and arrogance. So the whole purpose of morality is again defeated.

Teaching in Brighton, November 2008