the gift of nonduality

the gift of nonduality

The gift of nonduality. Actually, let me tell you this. Gendun Choepel said, you know, maybe it is a little intellectual but. Negating an existing, negation of an existence is not so difficult. I mean it’s quite difficult of course. But what is more difficult is negation of nonexistence. That is so difficult. So the gift of nonduality, Shakyamuni Buddha’s gift to this earth, if you can only think about this, wow, this is the most valuable gift. And it is not just like a, some really stimulating philosophical concept that you can read and sort of get sort of satisfaction intellectual. No no. It is very practical, very practical. This is why Shakyamuni said in the Heart Sutra, Tayata Om Gate Gate Paragate Parasamgate Bodhi Soha. And then he said this mantra is good for that that that including headache, toothache, everything. Remember in the Heart Sutra this mantra you should chant it is good for this, good for that. And yes of course people take it very literal, oh I have a toothache let’s chant TAYATA OM GATE GATE PARAGATE PARASAMGATE BODHI SOHA. Of course fine, no problem. But if you really contemplate OM GATE GATE PARAGATE PARASAMGATE BODHI SOHA, at the least in the beginning, because you are now beginning to have a little glimpse of nonduality, you will learn not to make a big deal out of your toothache. And that’s already a release from the toothache. The actual toothache is actual this big. It is the all the paraphernalia of surrounding the toothache. But beyond that I think it is almost, almost what you call it difficult for us to comprehend. I will tell you why. Because you know these great nondual philosophers such as Chandrakirti. He was not just like an university professor who read a lot, who thought a lot about the nonduality and who really are very impressive in talking about it. He was someone who actually, when it was necessary, milked a painted cow and fed the milk from the painted cow. Now we are talking about understanding the nonduality. Because in our head, painted cow how it can be milked. See we are stuck with that. Remember, a partial education, painted cow, impossible. For a Chandrakirti, the very idea of milking an actual cow, if that is possible, it is very possible to milk a painted cow. I come to think of it. How did this even occurred in our head, milking a real cow. I mean real just because I have to tell you as a real. For the Chandrakirti no difference. But this is difficult, this is very difficult to understand by people like you and me. Very difficult. Why? As the great Longchenpa said, for someone who has never tasted a salt, how do we tell them how the salt tastes like. We can only do things like give them a little bit of sugar and say: This is not it. A little bit of chilli, this is not it. That is all we could do. And that is what we are doing right now. That is what we are doing when we read the Sutras like Heart Sutra. Oh no nose, no eyes, no this, no that, that is the best we could do. And Buddha did so many times, remember I was telling you, Vajracchedika Sutra. He folded his robes, he washed his begging bowl, he sat very straight, and then he taught and taught and taught and towards the end of the teaching he said I have never taught. Very confusing. You talk forty pages and now you are telling us you have never taught. What do you mean?

Teaching in Brighton, November 2010

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